Adoption = Acronyms

I’ve written an adoptive version of the alphabet song. Sing with me, now: O-C-D-P-T-S-D, A-D-D-M-R-ADHD. F A S, R A D, got a new I E P, now it’s time for therapy, next time won’t you come with me?

Our kids came with baggage, and each tote is packed with letters.

Our son has such severe ADHD that initially, several different therapists thought he was on the Autism spectrum, on the Asperger’s end. His PTSD caused night terrors, inability to sleep and unwillingness to leave me. His main concern: that Hubby and I, like all other adults who previously claimed to love him, would disappear.

Our girl also has PTSD and ADHD. Her hallmark, though, is RAD, or Reactive Attachment Disorder. RAD can occur when a child is denied early bonding experience with a caregiver. Children with RAD often fail to thrive, aim direct defiance at main caregivers, are awkward in social interaction and form very quick and superficial attachments to peripheral caregivers (teachers, Sunday School teachers, counselors). They may also act inappropriately close with acquaintances and strangers. The benefit to this disorder: she will never, ever, ever EVER be anything but an angel in public. Her number one goal, with almost pathological precision, is to be seen as “sweet.” I know this because she told me. The drawback: she has a love-hate relationship with anyone called “Mama.”

RAD has colored our relationship from the very beginning. She called Hubby “Daddy” almost immediately, but made a point of not calling me anything at all. Once, I reprimanded her and she said nastily, “You’re not my real mom.” I was actually prepared for that one, so while the disrespect was unattractive, the actual statement wasn’t a big deal. I wanted to say, “Wow, that’s the best you can come up with? Every adopted kid says that. Come on, I know you can find a more creative insult!” But, since she was seven at the time, snarky comments just weren’t appropriate. Lately, she’s been very obviously doing the exact opposite of everything I say. In general, if Hubby, her teacher, her coach, her therapist, or even a total stranger gives her a directive, she obeys with little push-back. If I, on the other hand, ask her to do something, she uses one of the following tactics:

1. Ignores me completely.
2. Does the polar opposite.
3. Completes the task as slowly as humanly possible.

She watches to see if I’ve noticed, which our in-home counselor pointed out. “She (does whatever it is) and then looks at you from the corner of her eye to gauge your reaction.” Since she mentioned this, it’s become something of a game. I pretend not to notice, because any attention to the bad behavior makes it exponentially worse, but I’m actually watching her watch me. The “game” makes things a little more bearable…she thinks she’s sly, and it’s actually pretty funny sometimes. It’s also a little heartbreaking.

Parenting a RAD child is exhausting. Talking with Hubby this evening, I noted that her mama-targeted disobedience is getting really, really annoying, but assured him that I’m not taking it personally. His response: “If you’re annoyed, you’re taking it personally.” As usual, he sees and understands. I should just be honest. Sometimes, I just want her to give me a break.

Earlier today, I picked up Thriving Family, a free magazine sent by Focus on the Family. The words, “Why Don’t You Love Me Back? Understanding why some adopted kids reject Mom…” leaped out at me. The article, by Paula Freeman, notes that what I’m feeling isn’t uncommon among adoptive mothers. In an effort to avoid more hurt, adopted children who have experienced a rift or loss of their birth mother may reject anyone in the Mama role. “The thought of losing another mother is simply too much to bear. Thus Mom becomes the target of her child’s rejection because she is the greatest emotional threat.”

Maybe it’s time for a mental shift. This kid isn’t going out of her way to make my life miserable; she’s keeping me at a distance (likely subconsciously) to guard her heart from being broken again. I need to find ways to connect with her (she’s girly, so…painting nails, window shopping, making crafts) and reinforce that THIS Mama isn’t going anywhere. Where she is, mentally and psychologically, happened over the course of seven years. Expecting her to be “fixed” in a few short months is ridiculous bordering on insanity. It’s going to take a lot of time, and about six tons of patience.

And eventually, hopefully, our girl will no longer be defined by RAD. Unless, of course, it’s the 1980’s definition.

About Casey

Adoption = my life. I'll give it to you straight. Success, failure, truth.

Posted on September 16, 2014, in Adoption and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 16 Comments.

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  9. Hang in there. We have a little girl that sounds just like yours for 4 years now. It gets better – but very very slowly.
    You and she will have some amazing days and some days from hell.

    One things for sure. You will get to practice your patience skills. Remember to giver yourself some grace when you loose your patience.

    Hang in there. Good luck. Keep writing. It’s therapeutic.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much for the encouragement. It’s really great to hear from someone who’s also going through it. You’re right, and today was one of the amazing days!

      It’s funny–my husband told me the same thing yesterday about giving myself a break. πŸ™‚ Thanks again for the support! I’ll have to come check out yours!

      Like

  10. Aww… 😦 That’s sad. Your kids may have ADHD or RAD or anything else but they still are wonderful children. The little game you play is a bit humorous and cute! :’) I actually have the slightest bit of ADHD, OCD and ADD. D: But, it’s nothing severe. I just procrastinate, I’m jumpy, I get side-tracked a lot. It’s not diagnosed, but my dad agrees that I’m just a little bit like that. Oh well. Anyway, you have wonderful kids and wonderful posts! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

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